As our regular readers will know, sometimes I warn you in advance when there is a rant coming on. I trust for tonight, that none of you would expect anything less…

So where do I begin? Wow. Just wow. What an utter shambles that performance really was. No heart, no soul, no iota of quality. No drive, no commitment, and absolutely no desire. Where was the one quality midfielder, ready to put his foot on the ball, and grab the game by the scruff of the neck? Where was the impudent wide man, ready to run at the defenders and supply the forwards with a killer cross? And where was the brave centre forward, ready to put his head in where it hurts to grab that decisive goal? The answer to all of these questions is easy: nowhere. England were a shambles, from the manager to every single player on the pitch. Let us start at the start, shall we?

After the match against the USA, I felt Fabio Capello received some highly unnecessary stick. However, after tonight’s performance he will get utterly slated, and deservedly so. To be honest, I’ll happily kick that stick off.

My good friend Ross wrote a piece the other day in defence of Rob Green. Fair play to Ross, he was bang on the money. I personally was very disappointed that Green was dropped, and I feel it is now evident that Green will play no further part of this competition. Indeed, dropping a ‘keeper after a mistake is a good way to utterly demolish his confidence, and the news that Green only discovered his fate through the press will only further that ideal. Own goal then, Mr Capello.

Secondly, “Don Fabio” stuck with the most impotent striker of the top 10 nations at the World Cup by picking Heskey. Honestly Mr Capello, why? I’ve quoted Brian Clough on this blog before (even as a Notts fan!) and I’ll do so again: “the first job of a striker is to put the ball in the net”. Emile Heskey averages a goal every 8.4 games for England. How the hell does he get in the side? Then of course you can ask why arguably England’s most creative player, Joe Cole, didn’t even get on as a substitute, or why Peter Crouch got an entire 10 minutes.

Capello could quite easily have changed the shape of the side tonight, something which would suit both Gerrard and Rooney, arguably England’s best two players. In turn, this would add Cole to a side woefully lacking in creativity, something which just might help unlock that Algerian door.

Even if Capello hadn’t wanted to change the side, he could easily have picked Crouch. Although he has his critics, Crouch has a better International goalscoring record than any of the other strikers in the squad (averaging a goal every 1.8 games, over Rooney’s goal every 2 and a half games) Crouch is widely criticised for only scoring goals against “minnows”. Algeria are ranked 22 places below England and are hardly Brazil, so what is the issue?

Then there is the performance of Wayne Rooney: thoroughly out-of-sorts. Whether the issue is a mental one, unhappy with Capello’s tactics, or a physical one, it might well be an idea to remove him from the side for the Slovenia game. Jermaine Defoe will have a point to prove, and he and his Spurs strike partner Crouch might just be the right call. (penny for the thoughts of Darren Bent, mind!)

So are there any positives from the performance? Arguably, no, none at all. OK, so the inclusion of Barry helped the balance of the side, but we all knew that already. Lampard and Gerrard cannot play together, so Barry was always going to improve that side of the game. However, that is it.

I cannot finish this post without addressing Rooney’s post-match comments. For anybody who stormed off after the match, there’s a video below.

Yes Wayne, the England squad were booed. Why? Because England allegedly have some of the best players in the world, most of whom are paid in excess of £100,000 a week, yet they cannot beat an African side who have never progressed from the group stages. Not only that, but most of the England fans who have travelled to the game have spent thousands of pounds and travelled thousands of miles for the privilege. Tell me, what EXACTLY do you expect? Ask yourself how you’d feel if you’d spent 10 or even 20 per cent of your annual income to witness that monstrosity. How do you think you’d feel?

So we look forward to Wednesday and Slovenia. Will Capello learn his lesson and change the shape of the side? Personally, I doubt it. Mercifully, England’s future is still in their own hands, and fingers crossed they’ll capitalise on their good fortune. much like they did in Italia 90. However, I’d suggest much more likely is the idea of seeing the squad join the French on that first flight home.

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So we are a week into the tournament, everybody is buzzing with excitement and marvelling at the fabulous football on display night after night; enthralled by brilliant goals and revelling in the atmosphere of the greatest competition on Earth. Oh, what’s that? No you’re not? Most games have been rubbish, hardly any goals have been scored and the vuvuzelas are driving you up the wall? Thank Yoda it’s not just me!

Before I go on I’d like to apologise up front; I feel a rant coming on, but I’ll be as brief as possible.

I’m generally the World Cup’s biggest fan. I do everything I can to watch as many matches as possible, from the big boys of Brazil, Spain and Holland to the minnows of New Zealand and North Korea. I’ve watched 15 of the 16 games so far, and feel quite deflated about the quality of the tournament.

OK, early on in the competition, teams will feel that playing for a draw is acceptable. After all, getting off the mark in the first game is vital, and how many times do you hear the phrase “you don’t want to peak too soon”? So maybe teams are going all “George Graham” on us, and not having a go? Possibly.

Quite simply, the tournament has really lacked any genuine quality. The question we have to ask is why?

Many players, managers and pundits alike have blamed the official ‘Jabulani’ ball, claiming it is difficult to control and causes goalkeepers major issues. Makers Adidas have described the Jabulani as being “the roundest football ever”, in an effort to lead to more goals. Now that I can understand, because let’s face it, any time ‘keepers are having problems is good for us as fans. We all want to see goals, and spectacular 30-yarders are particularly special for us. So ‘keepers struggling is fantastic.

But then we’ve also heard that the ball is “difficult to control”, with players from many squads largely condemning it. However, surely I’m not the only fan to think ‘will you just shut up and get on with it’? To me the excuse ‘the ball is too round’ is up there with Ol’ Red Nose’s excuse about United’s players not being able to see each other in their grey shirts!

Adidas have instead hit out at the players, and their preparation. They blame a combination of a lack of practise and the game being played at altitude. Indeed, I can certainly understand the altitude argument. Every rugby fan (and physicist, for that matter) knows that matches played at altitude mean longer goal kicking is possible. (Just look at Mourne Steyn for the Springboks during last year’s Lions tour) I refuse to accept that football management and players were not aware of this phenomenon, so they should have prepared for it. On this note I unreservedly agree with Adidas.

My only quibble about the ball is the fact that Adidas supplied it to the Germans six months before the World Cup kicked off. Understandable I suppose, a German company attempting to aid the German national team, but it’s not really in the spirit of fair play. It would have been nice to see Steven Gerrard and Frank Lampard “getting their eye in” with the new ball, as it would for the rest of the world. However, it is just a football. If you’re being paid the amount some of these players are, you should be able play with tennis ball, let alone a new light size 5 football. Just look at Maradona doing just that below (apologies for the music, by the way!)

Then of course there is the vuvuzelas. The BBC have apparently received 545 complaints about the vuvuzelas in their coverage, and players such as Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo have joined the calls for FIFA to demand they are banned. Now I will admit the vuvuzelas are an irritant, but the BBC receiving complaints just seems ludicrous. What exactly do people expect the Beeb to do? Complete waste of effort from 545 people, in my humble opinion.

However, I can understand the players voicing their criticisms, even if I’m not sure they’re valid. Obviously, deafening noise makes communication difficult for the players, but if players can talk to each other in Old Firm games, or the Milan Derby, then their argument is null and void.

No, the way the quality of the tournament will improve is simply tactics. Managers need to remove the shackles on players, adopt a more attacking mentality and just let them go for it. As always, I’m optimistic this will be the case once we get to the last group games and the knock out stages (with the exception of Italy, obviously!)

England can easily do this by ensuring Heskey never gets another kick of the Jabulani (or any other football, for that matter.) Gerrard playing further up the field can only be good for England, and getting Joe Cole into the side will add to the side’s creativity.

Add to this a little shooting practise, there’s no reason at all to suggest England can’t do well in this tournament. However, whether they have the mentality to get past the likes of the Dutch or the Germans, only time will tell.

How do you feel about the World Cup? Have you been disappointed, or are you enjoying the tension of the tournament. Let me know below.